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CUSO WORKSHOP: BUILDING ALLIANCES THROUGH AFFECTIVE MULTIMODALITIES BY DR.EDA ELIF TIBET



Eda Elif Tibet is an award winning documentary filmmaker and a visual and multimodal anthropologist. She is a postdoctoral researcher at UniBern leading her own independent applied research initiative Animating the Commons hosted at the Critical Sustainability Unit at the Institute of Geography. Forming unorthodox coalitions and building alliances Eda supports and consults social businesses, organisations (mostly NGOs) and individuals, in various capacities. She is recognised to be a trailblazing engaged anthropologist by the Swiss Anthropology Association’s Interface Commission.Eda holds a Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF) funded PhD in Social Anthropology from UniBern (2019), an Mphil from the University of Kent, (2013/UK) and a BA in Economics from Istanbul Bilgi University (2009). She has co-founded KarmaMotion and EthnoKino.




Fieldwork Lessons for Empirical Researchers: Multidisciplinary Insights



12-13 May 2023

University of Geneva (Uni Mail), M4060


and online:

Meeting ID: 640 6747 0060

Passcode: 711807



Organisers:

Nataliya Borys, University of Fribourg, nathborys@yahoo.fr

Dr Lea Sgier, University of Geneva, Lea.Sgier@unige.ch


Outline


Historians, contemporary historians in particular, often rely on fieldwork, in the form of observational methods (participant and non participant observation) and conversational methods (biographic interviews, semi-structured interviews, etc.). They have not necessarily been trained in these methods though, contrary to researchers in anthropology or sociology for instance. And even researchers who have been trained in fieldwork methodology often face many obstacles and challenges, no matter how well prepared they are.


This workshop thematises some of the challenges that “fieldworkers” typically are confronted with, and does so by deliberately “thinking outside the box”: While we rely on standard social science expertise and literature with insights from anthropologists, sociologists or political scientists, we also look beyond : to researchers who have engaged with particularly challenging fields (such as conflict areas); and to other professionals who are in daily close contact with human beings, often on delicate issues: mental health specialists (such as psychiatrists catering to survivors of political violence); investigative journalists; or translators (mediating between researchers and respondents; or between doctors and patients) – to name a few.


Over two days, this doctoral workshop aims to raise and discuss a number of issues that are of potential relevance to historians and qualitative social scientists while going beyond textbook advice: how to navigate the typical obstacles of fieldwork (such as: access, navigating power relations and ethical conundrums in the field, protecting oneself and the participants, etc.); how to deal with non-standard situations (such as having to rely on translators; moving around dangerous areas); how to engage with vulnerable respondents (such as victims of violence or stigmatised groups); how to set up ethical research, etc.


PROGRAM


12 May 2023, Friday:


10:00-10:15

Nataliya Borys, University of Fribourg

Introduction. Why should we talk about fieldwork lessons? What kinds of lessons can be learnt from different disciplines?


10:15-11: 30

Lea Sgier, University of Geneva

Ethics, power and methodology in fieldwork-based research: lessons learned in two decades of research, graduate teaching and supervision, and research consultancy

11: 30 -12:00

Discussion



12:00-13:30

Lunch


13:30- 14:00

Presentation of PhD students research topics and expectations. Feedback from experts



14:00-14:30

Ueli Staeger, University of Geneva

Fieldwork at Global South international organizations: Positionality, interviews, and „deep hanging out“


14:30-15:00

Discussion


15:00-15:15:

Coffee-break

15:15-16:15

Branwen Spector, ethnographer, UCL

Going Ethnographic: Fieldwork Lessons for Historians about reflexivity, gender, race, class and other forms of subjective identity.


16:15-16:30

Discussion


16:30-16:45

Coffee-break

16:45-17:15

Celestin Mutuyimana, Psychologist, University of Zurich

How to face cultural diversity in research and how to manage difficult interviews (people with mental problems)? Lessons learnt from psychology.


17:15-17: 45

Ielyzaveta Cleguer, Psychologist, HUG, Program Migrants

Working with war migrants: psychologist’s perspective. Answering the participants’ questions.


17: 45- 18:15

Discussion



19:00- 22:00

Dinner.


13 May 2023, Saturday:


09:00-09:30

Discussion with PhD students about their research topics. Feedback from experts.


09:30-10:00

Peter Larsen, University of Geneva

“Other histories? 3 anthropological lessons grounded from ethnography in Vietnam”


10:00- 10:30

Eda Elif Tibet, Antropologist, University of Bern

Building Alliances through Affective Multimodalities for Empirical Researchers



10:30-11:00

Discussion


11:00- 11:15

Coffee break



11:15-11: 45

Maryna Dubrovina, Ukrainian filmmaker

Interviewing the Ukrainian Righteous (who saved the Jews during the Second World war) for the TV series. What went wrong in the interviews? How does the filmmaker cover such a topic? (screening the short extract with English subtitles). Discussion with Dubrovina (in Ukrainian with interpretation).


11 :45-12 :15

Marta Havryshko, historian, URIS fellow, Basel University

Interviewing the witnesses of the Holocaust in Ukraine. Gender dimensions of war and genocide.


12 :15-12 :45

Discussion


12:45-13:45

Lunch.



13:45-14:15

Nataliya Borys, University of Fribourg

Lost in Translation. Does language matter? Lessons learnt from the interpreter.


14:15-15:00

General discussion with PhD students. Conclusions.

Closing Apero.


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